Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference and Exhibition on Cell and Gene Therapy Madrid, Spain.

Day 1 :

Cell Therapy 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Falk Heinrichsohn photo
Biography:

Falk Heinrichsohn studied Business Administration in Merck, Germany. His main activities include, developing new business, establishing or changing company setups, improving existing business and structures. He has established a foundation called Fundação Século XXI – Sáude e Vida, to promote science and art and bringing them together in exhibitions under the umbrella theme of “Esperança de Vida” to sponsor young artists and patients with unmet medical need. He retired from corporate activity and from the foundation, and since then, he is a Freelance Consultant to various global leading alternative health and wellness companies and developed the first European affiliated Stem Cell Clinic in Malta in 2014 and in 2016, a clinic in Czech Republic, others are under development. Now, he is self-employed, at Aristoloft Lda, Portugal and formerly he worked as a Managing Director of various international subsidiaries of Merck KGaA & Merck Serono, Germany and also a Consultant to Precious Cells International, UK, a European cord blood bank. He is a member of International Consortium for Cell Therapy and Immunotherapy in Europe.

 

Abstract:

 

Background & Purpose: Cellular treatment and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapy are a potential alternative, disruptive medical treatment especially for an aging population, facing the limitation of evidence base medicine with long termed investigational character and a complex regulatory environment, while globally documented and accepted treatment.

 

Methods: For cellular treatment, there are two main pathways. First pathway is highly manipulated allogeneic and autologous cellular products, administered oral or via IV, intramuscular, etc., alone or in combination, which need to follow the existing regulatory 12-15 year lasting clinical trial path, or as a new technology, a new clinical trial and review concept as shown in Japan. The second pathway is to administer autologous stem cells in the frame of practice of medicine, the fastest way to personalize medicine with very limited, to no side effects, readily available today but questioned by some scientists and regulators in respect of safety and effectivity, and therefore considered as unproven medical treatment.

 

Results: Regulatory agencies are trying to find an approach which is beneficial and safe for patients. Unfortunately, by the time this reaches FDA and EMA regulated countries, this may take much time as it is a controversy and is discussed politically by various stakeholders.

 

Conclusions: Based on current scientific knowledge of risk-benefit of cellular treatment, countries outside the FDA/EMA regulated territory, advanced, approved, respective accepted autologous cellular treatments for patients, even via expansion of own stem cells. In the US, autologous stem cell treatment in the frame of practice of medicine is so far tolerated, but critically reviewed by the FDA with a trial to implement new regulatory limitations of stem cell treatment. The 21st century cure act is a step in the right direction in the US, but does not clarify most controversial issues in cell therapy, PoC treatment is highly debated in a historic FDA public hearing in September 2016. EMA Policy is similar to the US, while other countries are advancing further and faster with disruptive cell, stem cell & CAM technologies, resulting into growing international medical tourism and loss of new applied medical know-how in overregulated countries.

 

 

Background & Purpose: Cellular treatment and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapy are a potential alternative, disruptive medical treatment especially for an aging population, facing the limitation of evidence base medicine with long termed investigational character and a complex regulatory environment, while globally documented and accepted treatment.

 

Methods: For cellular treatment, there are two main pathways. First pathway is highly manipulated allogeneic and autologous cellular products, administered oral or via IV, intramuscular, etc., alone or in combination, which need to follow the existing regulatory 12-15 year lasting clinical trial path, or as a new technology, a new clinical trial and review concept as shown in Japan. The second pathway is to administer autologous stem cells in the frame of practice of medicine, the fastest way to personalize medicine with very limited, to no side effects, readily available today but questioned by some scientists and regulators in respect of safety and effectivity, and therefore considered as unproven medical treatment.

 

Results: Regulatory agencies are trying to find an approach which is beneficial and safe for patients. Unfortunately, by the time this reaches FDA and EMA regulated countries, this may take much time as it is a controversy and is discussed politically by various stakeholders.

 

Conclusions: Based on current scientific knowledge of risk-benefit of cellular treatment, countries outside the FDA/EMA regulated territory, advanced, approved, respective accepted autologous cellular treatments for patients, even via expansion of own stem cells. In the US, autologous stem cell treatment in the frame of practice of medicine is so far tolerated, but critically reviewed by the FDA with a trial to implement new regulatory limitations of stem cell treatment. The 21st century cure act is a step in the right direction in the US, but does not clarify most controversial issues in cell therapy, PoC treatment is highly debated in a historic FDA public hearing in September 2016. EMA Policy is similar to the US, while other countries are advancing further and faster with disruptive cell, stem cell & CAM technologies, resulting into growing international medical tourism and loss of new applied medical know-how in overregulated countries.

 

 

Cell Therapy 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ricardo Baptista photo
Biography:

Ricardo Baptista is a lead Scientist in the Process Development Team at Cell Therapy Catapult, London, UK. He is currently working on the development of scalable bioprocesses for manufacturing of human pluripotent stem cells, and on the industrialization of the production of stem cell derived products. He is also involved in projects aiming the automation and translation of bioprocesses for cell therapy manufacture. Previously in Cell Therapy Catapult, he held the role of Project Manager and Scientist in Product and Process Development team at CCRM-Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, in Canada. His work on the production of NK-92 cells using stirred-tank reactor technology allowed for a reduction in the manufacturing costs over 50%, and facilitated initiation of Phase II trials with NK-92 cells in Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, in Toronto. He is a Biological Engineer and has obtained his PhD Degree in Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering at Technical University of Lisbon, in 2005. His Post-Graduate work on the optimization of the production of human recombinant cytokines in mammalian cell bioreactors has supported projects in stem cell research at Dr. Joaquim Cabral and Dr. Peter Zandstra Stem Cell Bioengineering Labs. His second Post-doctoral work at Zandstra Lab in University of Toronto led to two relevant publications in stem cell bioprocessing. Recently, he has been invited as a Speaker in courses and workshops of cell therapy bioprocessing with lectures on Bioreactor Technologies and Process Intensification.

 

Abstract:

The commercialization of allogeneic stem cell derived medicines is committed to the development of processes. This process is done to generate consistent large amounts of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to be further differentiated to target somatic cell products. The pluripotent program of the cell and gene therapy catapult (CGT) focuses on the development of cost-effective bioprocesses for the industrial manufacturing of PSC-derived products in 2D and 3D culture systems. Here, we present a strategy for the development of closed, scalable, and controlled processes to generate high-density cultures of PSCs in aggregate-based stirred suspension culture, and highlight achievements in 2D-expansion process development. Cell banks of PSCs which are adapted to commercially available culture systems were established and characterized to industry standards. An iPSC line has been established from a pre-seed lot of the cell line. CGTRCiB10 was generated according to GMP principles. The ambr15® tool along with DOE methodology have been employed to support the establishment of a baseline process for the expansion of PSCs in stirred tank reactor (STR). This data suggests that the mixing parameters, energy dissipation and Kolmogorov size could support the scale-up of the vessel mixing properties and enable size-controlled cell aggregates in larger STR. We are currently exploring strategies for process intensification. Enzymatic dissociation of aggregates in the vessel was achieved, and rapid, closed medium exchange was possible using cell retention technologies. Defined media were evaluated for the expansion of CGTRCiB10  in adherent cultures. We used the quantum and the kSep® to develop an integrated, closed and semi-automated process for a cost-effective manufacture of iPSCs. Gene expression and metabolic patterns have been identified for PSCs cultured in adherent and dynamic suspension culture. This work shows the achievements of our program so far, and shows a bioengineer approach to develop scalable STR-processes for the controlled growth of PSCs in high-density aggregate-based suspension culture. This data suggests the potential use of cell retention technologies to support multiple unit operations such as feeding (perfusion culture) and cell harvest. Integration of the upstream processes of cell expansion and differentiation and downstream operations in the same vessel, would represent a step change in the development of cost-efficient processing platforms for the large-scale manufacturing of PSC-derived medicines. 
 

  • Cell Therapy| Gene Therapy | Stem Cell Therapy | Cellular Therapy Technologies |Markets & Future Prospects for Cell & Gene Therapy
Location: Leon
Speaker

Chair

Falk Heinrichsohn

Aristoloft Lda, Portugal

Speaker

Co-Chair

Tushar Patel

Mayo Clinic, USA

Session Introduction

José Sánchez del Río

Carlos III Madrid University, Spain

Title: Novel biodetection materials sensors
Speaker
Biography:

José Sánchez del Río has been working in the field of Biotechnology emphasizing on the Photonic Biosensors for more than 4 years. He did his PhD in Photonic Bio-Sensing and DNA Mutations Detection at Madrid Microelectronics Institute (IMM-CNM-CSIC). Then he worked in a private company as a Patent Researcher in Biometrics and Novel Sensors and after as a Post-doctoral fellow in the Face Recognition and Artificial Vision (FRAV) group of the Computer and Statistics department at Rey Juan Carlos University (URJC). He has done 2 Post-doctorates in the Nuclear Physics Department at the Matter Structure Institute (IEM-CSIC) and was specialized in high energy ions, protons and gamma radiation detection. He was working as a SW/HW Testing Engineer in the Aerospace field for Alter Technology and now he is an Instrument Scientist at IMDEA and Associated Professor of Electronics at UC3M.

 

Abstract:

In this conference, a novel sensor based on carbon nanotubes to detect biomolecules is presented. Different molecules can be immobilized in an array of nanotubes so that change in the electrical properties of the novel sensor is detected. Although sensitivity is not high enough, it can be used to detect changes in tissues and cells. 

Speaker
Biography:

Thierry Van Reeth completed PhD in Molecular Biology at the Free University of Brussels (ULB) in 2000. He was In-charge of the setup of the Transgenic Animal Facility of the Biopole ULB-Charleroi. He gained expertise in the field of Genetic Engineering and Mammalian Cell Culture. He started a company in the field of Transgenic Animals Services where he was In-charge of the Business and Scientific Development. He left the lab activity for three years to be part of the Business Development of a scientific recruitment company. He came back to Sciences in 2013 by joining Delphi Genetics as Scientific and Sales Manager to develop the services business of the company.

 

Abstract:

Delphi Genetics is an expert company in Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology. The company develops innovative and alternative technologies to improve bioproductions. The main technology, called Staby® ensures the production of recombinant proteins and plasmids DNA in the absence of antibiotic resistance gene following the regulatory agencies recommendations. The Staby® technology has been approved by several big Pharma companies that confirmed the increase of production yield mainly linked to better plasmid stability and a strong reduction of bioburden of energy. The Staby® technology has been also applied to DNA immunization and/or vaccination combined to a better antigen presentation providing an alternative method to classical antibody development methods. Using these technologies, Delphi Genetics is also involved in various programs related to gene therapy. Besides the fact that the antibiotic resistance genes removal technology meets regulatory requirements for the use of naked DNA in gene therapy, it offers advantages in production of plasmid DNA involved in the development recombinant viruses (i.e AAV, adenovirus or lentivirus). The Staby® technology guarantees the stability of the plasmid DNA during the scale-up production and secondly increases the production efficiency by focusing the energy used by E. coli on the plasmid production. Delphi Genetics is finalizing the development of a GMP production platform for plasmid DNA.

Olga Bukatova

Aseptic Technologies S.A, Belgium

Title: Scaling-up for commercial manufacturing of an allogeneic product

Time : 12:10-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Olga Bukatova has built her experience in implementation of aseptic fill and finish processes in biotechnology area, mainly in ATMP. 

 

Abstract:

Over the last years, numerous Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP) have followed a path from academic area to industry. Still, several factors are contributing today to slowing-down of the progress of clinical trials: 1) Regulatory aspects and lack of guidelines maturity; 2) Complexity of cell therapy techniques; 3) Challenges in scaling-up of manufacturing. The main complications in scaling-up of manufacturing of cell therapy products are in a strong correlation with their nature: they are living cells and pharmaceuticals at the same time.

Since allogeneic products are on the way to commercial success, it is crucial for a manufacturer to put in place adequate bioprocessing strategies and technologies to scale up lot sizes and reduce the cost of goods (COGs) of these expensive products. Inter alia, the manufacturers need to focus on the choice of the primary container for the cell therapy product and aseptic fill and finish process to ensure safety and scalability.

AT-Closed Vial® Technology is an aseptic fill and finish solution, based on a ready-to-use closed vial suitable for cryopreservation of ATMP.

The AT-Closed Vial® is manufactured in ISO 5 clean room with the stopper secured in place and gamma sterilized. This container guarantees 100% of Container Closure Integrity during cryogenic storage and widely used in the area of ATMP.

All equipment types process the AT-Closed Vial® in the same way: 1) the filling is performed by a special needle piercing the stopper and dispensing the drug product in the vial; 2) the stopper is then immediately resealed by a laser and 3) a cap is snap-fitted on it. The benefits of the technology are: quick and safe process even during manual operations, safe cryopreservation, better sterility assurance, reduced COGs, low product loss, scalability to automated process.

Isolated Crystal® L1, an integrated process equipment is a brand new all-in-one scaling-up solution, combining a simple isolator with short decontamination cycle and a robotic Crystal® L1 Filler for up to 600 vials per hour.

Ana Sofia Coroadinha

iBET - Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica, Portugal

Title: Title: Enabling tools for gene therapy viral vector development

Time : 12:40-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Ana Sofia Coroadinha has a Degree in Biochemistry and completed her PhD in Gene Therapy in a tripartite felowship between Généthon, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) and iBET. She became Director of the Cell Line Development and Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory (iBET and ITQB-UNL). Her research is focused on developing virus based biopharmaceuticals for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of reputed Biotechnology Letters and Scientific Reports journals.

 

Abstract:

Virus-Based Biopharmaceuticals (VBBs) produced in animal cells such as oncolytic vectors, virus-like particle vaccines and gene transfer vectors are among the most promising bioproducts. Gene therapy viral vectors interest and investment has grown significantly leveraged by, the recent approvals of gene therapeutic products Glybera and Strimvelis and by the very encouraging results obtained with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-T cells in cancer treatments. For the successful marketing of gene therapy, viral vectors enhanced and competitive manufacturing processes are required. On the other hand VBBs development can be cumbersome. The establishment of cell lines for virus production is an intensive and time consuming work. In addition, virus titration methods are laborious and often lack accuracy. In our research, we are developing novel enabling technologies that contribute for the progress in viral vector and cell line development. Different approaches can be used in cell line development. We have been using targeted integration and recently developed a high throughput cell line screening technology, the Single-Step Cloning Screening technology (SSCS). The SSCS merges cloning and screening by using split-GFP, a green fluorescent protein separated into 2 fragments which fluoresce upon transcomplementation. It can be used in cell line development, cell engineering as well as in vector engineering. We could obtain retroviral vector clones producing 1x108 infectious particles per mL and improved IP/TP ratios. To further expand SSCS approach to other virus and in order to quantify virus we are developing Visensors. The latter are cell based biosensors for label-free virus. Herein we will present and discuss these novel technologies which face the state of the art methodologies and how they can contribute for faster development of viral vectors for gene therapy. 

Speaker
Biography:

Tushar Patel is the James C and Sarah K Kennedy Dean for Research. He is a Professor of Medicine and Professor of Cancer Biology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, and a Consultant in the Department of Transplantation at Mayo Clinic in Florida. His research studies have focused on the study of cellular nanovesicles and non-coding RNA, and he has published extensively as an author or co-author of more than 140 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited for more than 13,000 times. His research program incorporates basic discovery studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer formation in the liver and bile ducts, with translational studies that seek to identify novel biomarkers for these cancers, and to improve therapeutic responses. 

Abstract:

Stem cell-based therapies have potential for treatment of solid organ injury by contributing to regenerative responses, through functional tissue replacement or paracrine effects. The release of extracellular vesicles (EV) from cells has been implicated in intercellular communication, and may contribute to beneficial paracrine effects of stem cell-based therapies. Therapeutic effects of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and vesicles released by these cells have been examined in models of hepatic injury and hepatic failure. These studies support a critical role for stem cell-derived EV in reparative responses following hepatic injury, thereby supporting their development for therapeutic use.

Speaker
Biography:

Ramasamy Paulmurugan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. He finished his Master’s in Biomedical Genetics from University of Madras, Chennai, India in 1991. In 1997, he earned his PhD degree in Molecular Virology from National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (under University of Madras, Chennai, India). After serving as Scientist for four years in Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Trivandrum, India, he joined University of California at Los Angeles as Visiting Scientist in 2001. In 2003, he joined Stanford University as Senior Research Scientist to work under Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford University. Since 2009, he is an Academic Faculty in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. Currently his lab is working on developing in vivo molecular imaging assays to noninvasively monitor different epigenetic process in live animals. His lab is also working on developing novel molecularly targeted therapies (microRNA and gene therapy) for various cancers, such as breast, hepatocellular carcinoma and glioma.

Abstract:

Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) is highly metastatic, and an obdurate cancer subtype that is not amenable to current chemotherapy regimens used in the clinic. Palliative chemotherapy with a combination of cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and cisplatin or carboplatin and doxorubicin is the only option currently available for treating patients with advanced stage metastatic TNBC. The use of high doses of chemotherapeutics often leads to the development of drug resistant cancer, and also can result in severe systemic toxicity. Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (GDEPT) is a superior gene therapy method for treating cancers, proven to be effective against many sub-types of cancers, and is currently in various stages of clinical trials. Gene therapy utilizing a single enzyme/prodrug combination targeting a single cellular mechanism requires a significant level of overexpression of delivered therapeutic transgene in order to accomplish therapeutic response. Hence, to overcome this obstacle, we developed molecularly targeted multi-gene therapeutic system in combination with a clinically feasible delivery mechanism, which, when delivered targets several cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells while simultaneously reprogramming cancer cells to evade from treatment response and in developing drug-resistant phenotypes. In addition, the genes that we use are holding the property of monitoring by noninvasive molecular imaging, which facilitates the monitoring the expression level of therapeutic genes in living animals to correlate with the therapeutic outcome. Moreover, target specific delivery and expression of therapeutic genes to cancer cells is another challenging task, which limits the efficiency of gene therapy. Hence, we are currently combining cancer specific expression of molecularly targeted multilevel therapeutic genes delivered by a minimally toxic nanoformulation, which efficiently deliver DNA for cancer gene therapy in vivo. This strategy will lead to a new generation of gene therapy system in combination with an efficient gene delivery system, which would change current treatment strategy for triple negative breast cancer, and can lead to a paradigm shift in cancer gene therapy.

Biography:

Joachim Scholpp is a Physician with more than 20 years professional experience spanning careers in Academia, Clinical Medicine and the Pharmaceutical Industry, where he held several leading positions in drug development. He has experience in all phases of drug development across several therapeutic areas. His core expertise is in the field of CNS drug development, development of ATMPs, exploratory clinical development and Clinical Pharmacology. He leads a group of clinical program leaders within BI’s Innovation Unit responsible for clinical aspects of developing new treatment modalities like ATMPs and indications beyond BI’s established core indications. He is board certified in Clinical Pharmacology, board certified in Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, holds a Diploma of the European Society of Anaesthesiology and is an authorized Physician for speciality training in Clinical Pharmacology (Chamber of Physicians, German Medical Association).

Abstract:

While for clinical development of Gene Therapy Medicinal Products (GTMPs), the general scientific and ethical principles of drug development and available guidelines related to specific therapeutic areas and indications apply, there are a number of unique challenges when developing a GTMP. For instance, the choice of an optimal vector system for a specific condition is critical and needs to be justified. As gene therapy is a relatively new treatment modality, and clinical experience with these approaches is limited, the benefit-risk analysis considering the target indication and alternative treatment options is of special importance. In addition, specific aspects like the delivery method, often requiring surgery or any other invasive procedure, have to be considered early. Monitoring of subjects exposed in clinical trials needs to account for the risks of the specific GTMP and for the persistence of the GTMP and/or its pharmacological effects. As preclinical data usually is less informative in comparison to NCEs or NBEs the design of a first-in-human clinical trial does have unique challenges, including the determination of the optimal starting dose and an adequate dose escalation scheme. Taking these aspects into account, a first-in-human clinical trial with a GTMP does have specific design features differing from a typical first-in-human clinical trial with an NCE or NBE.

Speaker
Biography:

Decio Basso headed the Federal University Santa Catarina at Florianópolis - Brazil where he earned a Medical Degree. He then attended Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil to pursue a specialization Medical Degree in Geriatric and Gerontology. After graduation, he accepted an internship, continuing education at Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA. He has been an integral part of Medical Staff at The Department of Immunology at the University of British Columbia – MBvax Canadá. He is serving as a Professor at Universidad Privada Del Este, Paraguay. He launched his own medical research organization known as the Gerobasso Medical Research Center. He is also a member of the scientific committee SOLCEMA (Sociedad Latinoamericana Stem Cell).

Abstract:

The Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive degeneration of the striated muscles of the body. It is caused by a genetic defect that prevents the production of a protein called dystrophin. DMD is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease. At the cellular level, this can be explained as muscle necrosis that exceeds the regenerative capacity of muscles. To endure the severities of every muscle contraction, muscle fibers have specialized cytoskeletal protein complexes, dystrophin. These complexes make it possible for myocytes to endure mechanical stress of the muscle contraction. In DMD, abnormalities in the dystrophin gene lead to non-expression of the protein, dystrophin. The lack of dystrophin causes the muscles to become fragile and easily damaged. Over time, the degeneration is such that the body cannot repair and muscles degenerate, causing disability in patients. The main strategies based on stem cells are: 1. Generate healthy muscle fibers; if stem cell implant in the muscles of the affected patients is made, they may generate functional muscle fibers that replace the damaged ones, 2. Reducing Inflammation: The muscles damaged by muscular dystrophy suffer a lot of inflammation. Inflammation process accelerates muscle degeneration. Certain types of stem cells can liberate chemical agents that reduce inflammation by reducing disease progression. In this clinical case, the patient (female) arrived in the clinic diagnosed as DMD. Treatment proposed with Stem Cell Implant (Mesenchymal Autologous): Stem cells are implanted through the release of growth factors and the act of vascular stromal cells to prevent the death of motor neurons. They feed the motor neurons or make them healthier, slow the degenerative process and reduce inflammation.

Speaker
Biography:

Guillaume Saint-Pierre is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Cofounder of PeptiGelDesign Limited. He was awarded a PhD in ceramic synthetic receptors for sensing applications at Cranfield University. He then joined a Cambridge based startup where he has developed a series of micro electro-analytical devices for critical healthcare applications. He moved to Spain and joined University Hospital of Toledo, Inspiralia S L, where he worked on spinal cord injury repair and cardiovascular replacement therapies. During this time, he developed and led the Material Department of Inspiralia where he has created and commercialised IPs for SMEs and Les.

Abstract:

Come along to find out how PeptiGel Design products can support your research PeptiGelDesign has developed a family of self-assembling peptide based hydrogel that mimics the cell microenvironment and provides a natural physiological environment for 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture. In addition to its standard formulation PeptiGelDesign also offer a design service, which allows it to deliver hydrogel with tailored properties. These systems have tunable mechanical strength to suit a range of different cell types and can be functionalization with biological epitopes or formulated with small or large molecules such as growth factors. Example areas of use include 3D cell culture, stem cell culture and directed differentiation. These products have also great potential for applications in the regenerative and medical field as they are animal free, biocompatible and biodegradable. They can therefore potentially be used as primary packaging for the in vivo delivery of drugs, cell or other biological factors. Our hydrogels can be designed to be injectable, sprayable and are naturally mucoadhesive systems. The unique shear thinning properties of our technology platform enables today’s and tomorrow’s Life Sciences and Biomedical sectors as a real alternative to animal/plant derived hydrogels as being biocompatible, biodegradable, compatible with cell staining/cell extraction-qPCR and additive manufacturing. To summarize the material design platform developed by PeptiGelDesign allows us to offer bespoke hydrogels with tailored properties to suit the needs of our customers