Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference and Exhibition on Cell and Gene Therapy San Antonio, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Vikas Kundra

MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA

Keynote: Clinically translatable human sstr2-based reporters for imaging gene expression

Time : 10:10-10:50

OMICS International Cell Therapy 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vikas Kundra photo
Biography:

Vikas Kundra is a professor of radiology, director of molecular imaging and has a joint appointment in the department of Cancer Systems Imaging at U.T.-MDrnAnderson Cancer Center. He trained at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has multiple publications in basic, translation, and clinical research and is grant funded. He is a fellow society of Body Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT-MR). He specializes in body imaging, focused on cancer imaging.

Abstract:

Clinical trials of gene therapy have been hampered by a lack of clinically relevant methods for in vivo detection of generntransfer. Evaluating success of gene transfer in the clinic is currently confinedprimarily to biopsy sampling, which providesrnlimited evaluation of in vivo gene delivery, is prone to sampling error, has associated morbidity and mortality, and can have problems with patient compliance especially when repeated evaluation or monitoring of multiple sites is needed. Instead,remonitoring of exogenous gene expression should be noninvasive and easily repeatable over time in the same patienttoinformrnregarding the location, magnitude, and kinetics of gene expression. Moreover, this could prove instrumental towards thernrational development of innovative formulations designed to selectively target particular tissues, organs, or disease sites. Reporter genes may be used to approach these needs.. These often encode enzymes, transport proteins, and receptors that most frequently bind and/or entrap an imaging agent. These may be limited for percutaneous imaging of humans because offen scatter, such as light based agents; size; immunogenicity, particularly if not of human origin; quantification; and availability offen clinically approved imaging agents. A desirable feature of such a reporter would be that it does not affect the intracellular milieurnby signaling or pump action so that it does not cause untoward effects in expressing cells. We find that human somatostatinrnreceptor type 2 gene-based reporters (SSTR2-based) reporters have such desirable features for imaging in animals and forrntranslation to humans. The SSTR2-based systems enable in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo assessment of the reporter, can be imagedrnusing clinically approved radiopharmaceuticals, and can be designed to be signaling deficient. Using small animal cognates ofrnclinical machines as well as machines designed for patients, we have used a combination of functional and anatomic imagingrnto quantify in vivo expression of SSTR2-based reporters and have used these to evaluate methods for improving expression.rnImaging and quantification of such reporters has been performed in small animals and, as a bridge to translation, in largernanimals.

  • Stem Cell Therapies, Celluar Therapy, Plant Stem Cell Rejuvenation
Location: Lone Star West
Speaker

Chair

Chan-Wha Kim

Korea University College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea

Session Introduction

Juliann G Kiang

Uniformed Services University of The Health Sciences, USA

Title: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology and Therapy after Ionizing Irradiation and Wound Trauma
Speaker
Biography:

Juliann G Kiang completed her PhD and Postdoctoral studies at the University of California at Berkeley. She is Professor of Radiation Biology at USUHS and Principal Investigator at AFRRI. She is an inventor and serves as Editorial Board Member of reputed journals. She has published more than 140 papers in reputed journals and held patents. Among all awards, she receives the Research and Development Achievement Award from the US Department of Army. She is a US DoD STEM model. She is the first to describe the skin-wound amplifies iNOS activation, cytokine concentrations, and sepsis after ionizing irradiation

Abstract:

Ionizing radiation induces mortality that can be further increased by ionizing radiation followed by non-lethal trauma insult caused by penetrating wounds, burns, blunt trauma, hemorrhage, or chemical exposures. The enhancement is mediated partly by activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) pathway, TRL4/NF-κB axes, cytokines increases, bacterial infection, and ATP loss. A promising therapeutic regimen for managing radiation combined with trauma (CI) is transfusion with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). In a mouse model, BMSCs were collected from the femur bone marrow of B6D2F1/J mice, isolated using a protocol adapted from STEMCELL Technologies Inc. The cells were expanded and cultivated in hypoxic conditions for 28 days in MESENCULT medium. Using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence imaging, the cells were identified by BMSC-positive markers: CD44, SCA-1, and STRO-1 with colonies formed. B6D2F1/J mice were exposed to 9.25 Gy 60Co-γ photon radiation (0.4 Gy/min) followed by a 15% total body skin-wound trauma. These mice received a single injection of 3x106 BMSCs per mouse 24 hr later. As a result, BMSCs treatment significantly improved mouse 30-day survival by 30% above the vehicle group, accelerated wound healing rate, and increased bone marrow cell recovery. In ex vivo studies, radiation at 4 Gy or 6 Gy significantly decreased BMSC proliferation. Pretreatment with either AKT inhibitor or p38-MAPK inhibitor but not JNK inhibitor blocked the reduction, suggesting radiation-induced BMSC death is mediated by AKT and p38-MAPK. (Supported by NIH/NIAID YI-AI-5045-04 and AFRRI 33529. The views expressed do not necessarily represent NIH, AFRRI, USUHS, or US DoD).

Speaker
Biography:

Anjali Verma completed her Masters in Biotechnology from IIT Roorkee, India and MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Wayne State University, MI. She is a Scientist in the Stem Cell Bioprocessing Group at EMD Millipore and has been with the company for 8 years. Her group’s current focus is on development of media, supplements and bioprocessing of human Mesenchymal Stem cells

Abstract:

The long-term outlook for stem cell therapy predicts an increased need for high quality materials that are animal origin-free. Human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) are an attractive target for clinical study as therapeutic agents. Large scale manufacturing of these adherent-dependent cell types necessitates movement away from planar culture and toward technologies such as stirred tank bioreactors where suspension culture using microcarriers is enabled. Cell culture medium and supplements are critical factors of the scale up process, yet many processes currently contain animal-derived components. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is a commonly-used supplement associated with regulatory, supply, and consistency challenges. Eliminating this reagent will require thorough evaluation of animal origin-free materials for compatibility with stem cell therapy applications. Here, we evaluated growth of bone marrow derived hMSCs with a variety of cell culture media formulations and serum-free supplements. A high throughput shake flask platform was developed to test select media. A wide range of performance was observed between the different types of media and serum- free supplements. Also a positive performance in static culture was not necessarily predictive of that under agitated conditions with microcarriers. Additionally, we used recombinant trypsin and associated animal-free inhibitors to assess implementation of a fully FBS-free system. The combination of serum-free systems and high quality reagents supports the future implementation of large scale manufacturing solutions of hMSCs that will be required following clinical success

Break: 13:20-14:00
Speaker
Biography:

Chan-Wha Kim has completed his PhD and Postdoctoral studies from MIT. He is the Professor at the Korea University located in Seoul, Korea. He is a member of the Korean Acedemy of Science and Technology. He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Proteomics

Abstract:

Electromagnetic field (EMF) is a well-known mechanical stimulation that induces neural differentiation. This is an affordable and effective way to treat neurodegenerative disease. Even though its function is distinctive, the underlying cellular mechanism of neural differentiation remains unclear. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) which exposed to 50 Hz, 1 mT for 12 days were differentiated into neural cells. Besides differentially expressed proteins, especially ferritin light chain (FLC), were verified using 2-DE analysis. FLC is an important element in controlling iron ion homeostasis and is abundant in the specific region of central nervous system (CNS). After exposed to EMF, intracellular free Zn ion concentration was observed to decrease as well as block activity of MRE transcription binding factor 1 (MTF1). Down-regulated MTF1 had an effect on the synthesis of MT3 and differentiation of hBM-MSCs to neural cells in EMF compared with control. EMF also induced activation of downstream candidates of MT2 in novel neural differentiation mechanism. From astrocyte, MT3 is secreted into neuron. The level of MT3 changed, in response to EMF, allowed the adaptation of binding affinity of dihydropyrimidinase related protein 2 (DRP2). DRP2 is one of wellknown neural growth factors. This study demonstrates that EMF triggers up-regulation of FLC in BM-MSCs. Up-regulated FLC has positive effects on the differentiation of BM-MSCs to neural cells compared with control group. EMF also induces activation of downstream candidates of FLC in novel neural differentiation mechanism. Intracellular iron level was down-regulated and ferritin heavy chain (FHC), iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP-1) and cofilin were up-regulated in EMF exposed group. Up-regulated cofilin triggers actin filament reorganization in neural morphogenesis

Speaker
Biography:

Bruno Doiron, PhD is a faculty member at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and University of Texas at San Antonio. He received his undergraduate degree from University of Moncton, Canada and graduate degrees from University of Montreal, Canada and University of Paris Descartes, Paris, France. As project leader, he has made major discoveries in the field of gene regulation by nutrients and has 4 patents on the modulation of glucose metabolism as it relates to the treatment diabetes and cancer. He has extensive experience in basic research at the physiologic and molecular levels and in respective applications to the biotechnology field.

Abstract:

Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) offer a new treatment paradigm compared to current approaches to treat diabetes. The CNIP approach preferentially increases the number of beta (insulin-producing) cells in the adult pancreas without increasing the number of non-insulin-producing cells. CNIP provides for in vivo exposure of pancreatic cells to three compounds that work synergistically at the cellular level in the pancreas to stimulate formation of insulin-producing beta cells. The method acts on post-developmental mechanisms to induce beta cell formation without stem cells and without activating the embryonic pathway; thus, undesired cells are not induced. Impact: • A new therapy for diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 is a significant and compelling unmet medical need • High impact on society; will “make lives better”, potentially impacting tens of millions of people worldwide • CNIP approach represents a new paradigm in diabetes treatment (restoring insulin production vs. insulin and insulinstimulating drugs); potentially a “game-changer” technology • Solid proof-of-concept established in small animal studies; method has been shown to “cure” diabetes in a mouse model

Speaker
Biography:

E Al-Ali obtained her BSC in 1993 from Kuwait University Worked for Kuwait University as Research Assistant, then joined KISR on October 5, 1993 and led 5 projects. She has published more than 5 papers in reputed journals and international conferences. Her field of experience, in plant virus detection, primer design, cloning and sequencing, ELISA, DNA Extraction, PCR Amplification, RCA Rolling Circle Amplification, TYLCV detection on tomatoes, also trained twice in the University of Wisconsin Madison under the supervision of Prof. Amy Charkowski., as well as University of Washington state under supervision of Pro.Hanu Pappu.

Abstract:

TYLCV was reported as a major pest of tomato but it was not fully characterized at the molecular level. In addition to TYLCV, tomato may be susceptible to over 40 other viruses transmitted by whiteflies. The high economic losses induced by whiteflytransmitted viruses in Kuwait necessitates a rapid action for identification and molecular characterization of the virus species present in Kuwait in order to develop and recommend appropriate control strategies. Tomato leaf samples were collected on monthly bases from October 2014 till January 2015. Collections were made from greenhouses farms in Wafra and Abdally. Gemini viral DNA was extracted from 200 collected infected tomato leaf samples using Dellapotra method. Then, PCR protocol was optimized and used on 50 collected infected leaf tomato samples by using two different primers. Field observations carried out in this project for the period between October 2014 and January 2015 of tomato grown under protection and in open-fields indicated that the symptoms such as leaf yellowing, leaf cupping, leaf curling, stunting of plants, were common. Whitefly infestation was very common. Data from this activity showed that TY1(+) &TY2(-) primers were successful in detecting the TYLCV in samples collected in January, and partially sequencing of the positive TYLCV done and the amplicon showed a new spp of TYLCV was detected. These data indicate that the TYLCV present in Kuwait belongs to a separate species from those reported in other countries, and hence, has been named tomato yellow leaf curl Kuwait virus (TYLCKWV).

H Al-Hashash,

Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Kuwait

Title: TYLCV characterization and identification on cucumber using ELISA
Speaker
Biography:

Hanadi K Al-Hashash has graduated from Faculty of science, Kuwait University. She obtained her Bsc in Microbiology (Major) and Biochemistry (Minor), and then joined KISR since May 2001 till present. Since then, she worked as task leader in several project within Biotechnology Program. She led one General Research acitivity (FB067G). She has an excellent experience in microbial isolation and identification using conventional as well as wel as molecular techniques, DNA, RNA, and protein extraction, using restriction enzymes, and using ELISA.

Abstract:

Cucumber plants belong to the Cucurbitaceae family which also includes plants like, squash, melon, watermelon, and zucchini. Cucumbers are considered to be one of the most important agricultural crops in Kuwait. They are usually cultivated in February, March, August and September. However, considerable economic losses have been recorded in Kuwait’s cucumber crops mainly due to viral diseases. Plant infections caused by viruses are very common in Kuwait, particular in cucumber and other important crops, like tomato. Symptoms of these viral diseases include mosaicking, mottling, yellowing, and curling of leaves, as well as fruit deformation. Viral identification is difficult due to the submicroscopic size of the virus and their presence in low concentrations. The developments of serological techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) have overcome these limitations, making viral identification easier. This aim of this study was to detect viral infections in cucumber leaf samples using ELISA. During field visits, 150 samples of cucumber leaves were collected, and the symptoms resulting from viral diseases were recorded. The samples were tested for the presence of six viruses WMV, ZYMV, CMV, MNSV, PRSV, and SqMV, using double sandwich ELISA kits (DAS- ELISA). The results obtained from ELISA testing indicated that in the collected cucumber samples, all six viruses tested were detected mainly in double or triple infections. This preliminary survey found: (WMV), (ZYMV), (CMV), (MNSV), (PRSV), and (SqMV). Filed survey revealed that cucumber crops were severely infected with viruses. Very high incidences of mixed infections were observed; causing yield losses exceed 80%.

Break: 16:00-16:20
Speaker
Biography:

Heggeness attended Haverford College in Philadelphia before completing a PhD in membrane biology with Dr SJ Singer at UC San Diego before completing a postdoc with Purnell Chopin at the Rockefeller University. He then obtained an MD and completed a residency in Orthopaedicsurgery . He joined the faculty at the Baylor College of Medicine in 1990.He took the Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Kansas-Wichita in 2013, where he continues his research on both clinical topics as well as the basic science of bone, and intraosseous nerves. He has 84 peer reviewed publications

Abstract:

We describe the discovery of the presence of large density of quiescent pluripotent stem cells within peripheral nerves in adult mice. We have demonstrated that these cells can be induced to proliferate exuberantly by either exposure to the human cytokine BMP2, a commercially vended bone inducing agent (InfuseTM) used for spinal fusion. The BMP2 molecule is an ancient one, and is known to act in dorsal-ventral differentiation in insects.We have also learned that the this cellular proliferation can be induced by physical trauma to the nerve. These cells have now been harvested, by surgical excision of a stimulated nerveand cultured in appropriate restrictive media. The cells have been characterized by our group in and appear to be a new class of truly pluripotent stem cells that fulfill many of the criteria for embryonic stem cells. Immunohistochemical staining experiments have demonstrated that these cells express the four critical genetic markers for embryonic stem cells: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. Interestingly, as hoped, the immunohistochemical staining shows that the staining we demonstrate is confined to the cell nucleus. We have also demonstrated the abundant presence of mRNA for these markers by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) techniques. We have successfully induced differentiation of these cells into osteoblasts, endothelial cells, ectoderm and endoderm. We have induced these cells from 3 mammalian species: mouse, rat and human. These cells may represent a very attractive new source of cells for regenerative therapies, as a small biopsy of a non-essential cutaneous nerve could be used to grow and differentiate self-specific therapeutic cells for an individual patient. This would likely remove any risk of immune rejection of cells that are truly “self ”. Risks of malignant transformation and teratoma formation would also likely become moot. In general, embryo derived stem cells require special culture techniques, are not motile, and in culture form colonies. While our newly discovered cells do express all of the critical embryonic stem cell markers for mouse and human, they are distinct in that they are motile, adhere to glass or plastic substrate, and are much easier to culture. They do not require “feeder cells”. Most remarkably, they can be derived from adult animals and adult humans. We suggest that they be referred to as Nerve Derived Adult Pluripotent Stem cells or NEDAPS cells. We recognize that there have been scandals in the past when similar claims have been made that may have been more wishful thinking that fact. That is not the situation here.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed Shawky has completed his MSc in Pharmaceutical Sciences in the field of Biochemistry from Zagazig University, Egypt. He is the lecturer of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

Abstract:

Objective: Renal fibrosis is the common end point of most progressive renal diseases. Renal fibrosis shouldn’t be viewed as a simple and uniform scar but rather as a dynamic system. Pathological fibrosis results in glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy and dilatation and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Thus, effective treatments that halt or perhaps induce regression of renal fibrosis have potential to provide an immense medical, social and economical benefits. Mesenchymal stem cells have a potent regenerative power for regeneration of different tissues had been approved recently. In our study which aims to determine the therapeutic effect of stem cells for the treatment of renal fibrosis induced by cisplatin and the evaluation of a natural extract from ginger (10-dehydrogingerdione) for this purpose also. Methods: Renal fibrosis induced via a single dose of cisplatin (4 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneal per rat and then fibrosis had been evaluated through Masson’s Trichrome stain for kidney tissues sections after 1 week from cisplatin administration. Rats were divided into 4 groups. Kidney functions were determined, nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB), insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), kidney lipid peroxidation (MDA) and glutathione reduced (GSH) had been also determined. Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) and Masson’s Trichrome (MT) stains had been performed too for kidney tissues. Results: Administration of mesenchymal stem cells and 10-dehydrogingerdione has been existed a significant decrease in kidney functions, NF-kB, IGF-I, FGF-23 and kidney MDA, while caused a significant increase in the antifibrotic HGF and antioxidant kidney GSH as compared with renal fibrotic rats. Histopathological findings existed an enhancement in kidney architecture in both H&E and MT stains as compared with those of renal fibrotic rats. Conclusion: According advanced results which conclude that administration of stem cells and 10-dehydrogingerdione may have a potential therapeutic target in renal fibrosis induced by cisplatin

Speaker
Biography:

Meshaal pursuing Research and currently working in the King Saud University located at Saudi Arabia

Abstract:

Background: Sickle cell disease is associated with several systemic complications and life-threateningcrises. The use of drugs that increase hemoglobin F level, such as hydroxyurea, in patientswith sickle cell disease is associated with a reduction in the severity of the disease. Aim: To compare the outcome of patients adherent to hydroxyurea with those who are poorly adherent and to determine which age group is more likely to be poorly adherent and hence suffer more complications. Subjects & Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh between January 01 and March 31, 2014. The study included 140 patients, 60 of them were receiving hydroxyurea therapy. Results: Patients who were adherent to hydroxyurea treatment suffered less complications and had lessfrequent sickling crises than patients who were poorly adherent to therapy. Patients belonging to the age group 15 to 30 years were found to be less adherent to treatment than other age groups and consequently they suffered more complications. Conclusion: More attention and health education should be offered to adolescents and young adults having sickle cell anaemia in order for these patients to benefit from the positive impact of hydroxyurea on the disease outcome

Speaker
Biography:

Samar Omar Abdullah Bin Rabah completed PhD and currently working as an associate professor in King Abdulaziz University located at Saudi Arabia

Abstract:

Forty five rats were divided into the following groups (15 each): Group I was served as a control group, Group II was subgrouped to IIa, b and c, that were administered oral 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg of Diclofenac Sodium (DS) respectively for 2 days after fasting for 20 hours. Group III was subgrouped to IIIa, b and c. These rats were maintained on oral Moringa oleifera (MO) (500 mg/kg) daily for one week and then they were administered the same doses as in the previous group. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed several alterations in the villous absorptive cell epithelial cells. These changes were mainly separation between two adjacent cells, degeneration and mitochondrial damage. Moreover, plasma cells and eosinophils were observed in the lamina properia. Administration of MO resulted in organization of microvilli, increase in goblet cell numbers with extruding their content into the lumen, abundant mitochondria in the cytoplasm of absorptive cells. It is also noticed that the inflammatory cells appeared tightly contact with the lamina properia. Morphometric analysis showed significant increase in the numbers of goblet cells especially in the groups received voltaren and MO. In conclusion the current study showed that MO leaves might have a partial protective effect on the rat duodenal mucosal histological changes resulted from the administration of high doses of diclofenac sodium in rat.